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Can somebody explain to me what is central end-peripheral sleep apnea? treatments included?

March 7th, 2011

(sorry for the grammer and spelling)
So far i found out that tissues at the back of your throat are collapsing and that’s normal but the thing that prevents it from collapsing is the problem.

Well, my cousin’s son (infant) is having a problem breathing and some doctors said that there is something wrong with the brain (the neurons go to something, i don’t know; i’m sorry). The probable diagnosis was central end-peripheral sleep apnea or obstructive sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. Since the muscle tone of the body ordinarily relaxes during sleep, and since, at the level of the throat, the human airway is composed of walls of soft tissue, which can collapse, it is easy to understand why breathing can be obstructed during sleep. Mild, occasional sleep apnea, such as many people experience during an upper respiratory infection, may not be important, but chronic, severe obstructive sleep apnea requires treatment to prevent sleep deprivation and other complications. The most serious complication is a severe form of congestive heart failure called cor pulmonale.

Individuals with decreased muscle tone, increased soft tissue around the airway (e.g., due to obesity), and structural features that give rise to a narrowed airway are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea. Older people are more likely to have OSA than younger people. Men are more typical sleep apnea sufferers, although the condition is not unusual in women or children.

Common symptoms include loud snoring, restless sleep, and sleepiness during the daytime. Diagnostic tests include home oximetry or polysomnography in a sleep clinic.

Some treatments involve lifestyle changes, such as avoiding alcohol or muscle relaxants, losing weight, and quitting smoking. Many people benefit from sleeping at a 30 degree angle or higher, as if in a recliner. Doing so helps prevent gravity from collapsing the airway. Lateral positions (sleeping on your side), as opposed to supine positions (sleeping on your back), are also recommended as a treatment for sleep apnea, largely because the airway-collapsing effect of gravity is not as strong to collapse the airway in the lateral position. Some people benefit from various kinds of oral appliances to keep the airway open during sleep. “Breathing machines” like the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may help. There are also surgical procedures that can be used to remove and tighten tissue and widen the airway.

The most common treatment for sleep apnea is the use of a positive airway pressure (PAP) device[13] (PAP), which ‘splints’ the patient’s airway open during sleep by means of a flow of pressurized air into the throat.

In addition to PAP, a dentist specializing in sleep disorders can prescribe Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT). The oral appliance is a custom made mouthpiece that shifts the lower jaw forward which opens up the airway. OAT is usually successful in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. OAT is a relatively new treatment option for sleep apnea in the United States, but it is much more common in Canada and Europe.

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One Response

  1. Chairman_Mao Says:

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. Since the muscle tone of the body ordinarily relaxes during sleep, and since, at the level of the throat, the human airway is composed of walls of soft tissue, which can collapse, it is easy to understand why breathing can be obstructed during sleep. Mild, occasional sleep apnea, such as many people experience during an upper respiratory infection, may not be important, but chronic, severe obstructive sleep apnea requires treatment to prevent sleep deprivation and other complications. The most serious complication is a severe form of congestive heart failure called cor pulmonale.

    Individuals with decreased muscle tone, increased soft tissue around the airway (e.g., due to obesity), and structural features that give rise to a narrowed airway are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea. Older people are more likely to have OSA than younger people. Men are more typical sleep apnea sufferers, although the condition is not unusual in women or children.

    Common symptoms include loud snoring, restless sleep, and sleepiness during the daytime. Diagnostic tests include home oximetry or polysomnography in a sleep clinic.

    Some treatments involve lifestyle changes, such as avoiding alcohol or muscle relaxants, losing weight, and quitting smoking. Many people benefit from sleeping at a 30 degree angle or higher, as if in a recliner. Doing so helps prevent gravity from collapsing the airway. Lateral positions (sleeping on your side), as opposed to supine positions (sleeping on your back), are also recommended as a treatment for sleep apnea, largely because the airway-collapsing effect of gravity is not as strong to collapse the airway in the lateral position. Some people benefit from various kinds of oral appliances to keep the airway open during sleep. "Breathing machines" like the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may help. There are also surgical procedures that can be used to remove and tighten tissue and widen the airway.

    The most common treatment for sleep apnea is the use of a positive airway pressure (PAP) device[13] (PAP), which ‘splints’ the patient’s airway open during sleep by means of a flow of pressurized air into the throat.

    In addition to PAP, a dentist specializing in sleep disorders can prescribe Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT). The oral appliance is a custom made mouthpiece that shifts the lower jaw forward which opens up the airway. OAT is usually successful in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. OAT is a relatively new treatment option for sleep apnea in the United States, but it is much more common in Canada and Europe.
    References :
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_apnea

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