Health Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

My boyfriend(17) has Central Sleep Apnea?

December 27th, 2011

What does it mean?

Can it kill you or get worse?

Can it be cured?

He is 145 pounds about, and 5’8.

What are his risk?

Does it make a diff. since his only 17?

Help me, Thank You so so Much!!! <3

Central Sleep Apnea is fairly uncommon. I have only seen a few every year or so. it can be treated but usually with Bipap and a set Resp-Rate. His weight really does not matter in this case, because it is a brain malfunction in this case (simple terms) not a soft tissue issue. But if he gets proper treatment for his Sleep Apnea, he might lose some weight because he will be more active during the daytime and not so sleepy.

🙂

3 Responses

  1. Technerd_Shawn Says:

    Central sleep apnea is when you repeatedly stop breathing during sleep because the brain temporarily stops sending signals to the muscles that control breathing.

    Oxygen, nasal CPAP, or bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) may be used for some types of central sleep apnea.

    Some types of central sleep apnea are treated with drugs that stimulate breathing.

    Patients should avoid the use of any sedative medications.

    Complications may result from the underlying disease causing the central sleep apnea.
    References :

  2. Scott Says:

    Central Sleep Apnea is fairly uncommon. I have only seen a few every year or so. it can be treated but usually with Bipap and a set Resp-Rate. His weight really does not matter in this case, because it is a brain malfunction in this case (simple terms) not a soft tissue issue. But if he gets proper treatment for his Sleep Apnea, he might lose some weight because he will be more active during the daytime and not so sleepy.

    🙂
    References :
    I am an RCP

  3. David F Says:

    I don’t know what "central" means, but I’ve got sleep apnea too. I snore like a freight train.

    Solution: make an appointment with the family doctor. Ask for a referral to a sleep lab.

    At the sleep lab (usually in a hospital), he’ll sleep 1 night, and technologists will measure his oxygen levels, brain waves, snore volume, etc. This usually confirms sleep apnea.

    Often, a second night is booked, to calibrate a CPAP (constant positive air pressure) machine. This is a small bedside air pump, that gently blows air through a mask over his nose. It often has a humidifier built in.

    Then, the sleep specialist can give him a "prescription" for purchasing this device. He’ll sleep a whole lot better, every night, with no snoring.
    References :

Leave a Comment

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Posted by admin1 and filed under Central Sleep Apnea | 3 Comments »

|