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Announcement: Sleep Apnea

September 1st, 2009

Sleep Apnea or Sleep Apnoea (depending on where you live) is a common disorder nearly as common as adult diabetes with the most common and usually most severe sleep apnea condition being known as obstructive sleep apnea or OSA for short.


It is thought that one in twenty-five middle-aged men and one in every fifty middle-aged women may have Sleep Apnea and of these less than half are likely to have been diagnosed. Sleep apnea diagnosis usually depends on other persons observations of the sufferer and the  recognition of the sleep apnea symptoms, particularly sleep apnea snoring and cessations in breathing while asleep, as most sufferers may not even be aware that they have the condition.

With the American Sleep Foundation reporting that sleep deprivation, not cancer or coronary illness, now constitutes the number one killer in the Western World, Sleep Apnea is fast becoming a major issue for western society.

There are three types of Sleep Apnea, these being.

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea where the airway collapses or becomes blocked and restricts breathing, and is the most common form of Sleep Apnea .
  • Central Sleep Apnea is the less common form of Sleep Apnea and is where the brain fails to tell the body to breath and
  • Mixed Apnea which is a combination of both Central and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Untreated Sleep Apnea can increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, obesity and diabetes. The broken sleep pattern that comes with Sleep Apnea also leads to increased tiredness and decreased awareness in waking hours, with some sufferers experiencing periods of momentary sleep events at times throughout the day.

The sleep apnea treatment method adopted will depend on the severity of the condition and the physical condition of the patient and in most cases involves the ongoing use of a CPAP or Continuous Positive Air Pressure machine,  but can also include the use of physical devices such as Mandibular Advancement Devices (or MAD’s) or in some cases sleep apnea surgery.

Sleep Apnea is normally something that develops over a period of time and as such is usually not noticed as a problem, with most people putting the symptoms down to just being part of “growing older”; this is not necessarily the case.

There are no blood or other post event tests for determining Sleep Apnea , and as such Sleep Apnea is normally diagnosed as a result of comments or complaints from sleeping partners or family who have noticed the gaps in breathing or the excessive snoring.

Sleep Apnea can be treated or managed once diagnosed. The risks to your health associated with failing to act on sleep apnea are significant and Sleep Apnea should not be taken lightly. If you have any of the symptoms or are told by your partner that you do, then you may be suffering from Sleep Apnea, take action now, get yourself assessed, it could save a life, yours.

 

Posted by admin and filed under Sleep Apnea | 2 Comments »

Home Mechanical Ventilation CH 02-HMV Considerations

May 20th, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:5:22

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Diaphragm Pacing CH 02-Monique’s Story

April 27th, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:4:15

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea

April 21st, 2010

This patient education video explains obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses its causes, symptoms, dangers and treatment options.

Duration : 0:6:42

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Home Mechanical Ventilation CH 01-Introduction

March 22nd, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:4:24

Read the rest of this entry »

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Diaphragm Pacing CH 04-CCHS Story

March 10th, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:1:41

Read the rest of this entry »

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Diaphragm Pacing CH 06-Final words

March 7th, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:3:31

Read the rest of this entry »

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Diaphragm Pacing CH 01-Diaphragm Pacing

March 1st, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu


CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:4:18

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin and filed under Central Sleep Apnea | No Comments »

Home Mechanical Ventilation CH 06-Clinic Visits

February 26th, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:4:1

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin and filed under Central Sleep Apnea | No Comments »

Diaphragm Pacing CH 05-Jim’s Story

February 20th, 2010

Sheila Kun
Nurse Case Manager Pediatric Pulminology
skun@chla.usc.edu

CCHS
Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome
congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or primary alveolar hypoventilation, is a respiratory disorder that is fatal if untreated. Persons afflicted with Ondine’s curse classically suffer from respiratory arrest during sleep.

Persons who have CCHS get it at birth, or develop it due to severe neurological trauma/damage to the brainstem. The diagnosis may be delayed because of variations in the severity of the manifestations or lack of awareness in the medical community, particularly in milder cases. (Chin, 2006).[1]

This very rare and serious form of central sleep apnea involves an inborn failure of autonomic control of breathing. About 1 in 200,000 live born children have the condition. In 2006, there were only about 200 known cases worldwide. In all cases, episodes of apnea occur in sleep, but in a few patients, at the most severe end of the spectrum, apnea also occurs while awake.

A persons gender or race is not a determining factor when dealing with susceptibility to CCHS. Males and females are both affected equally and a person’s ethnicity, as of this point, has been not been coincided a variable to the disease.

Duration : 0:8:14

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by admin and filed under Central Sleep Apnea | No Comments »